Anagrams and meaning: “The Longest Time”

Anagrams are words formed by rearranging the letters of a different word, as in “elbow”-“below”, “act”-“cat”, “save”-“vase”, or “stressed-dessert”. In this activity (B1/B1+) based on Billy Joel’s “The Longest Time” (1983), the students read the lyrics and try to find the forty-five anagrams that have been included. The students write their answers on the right-hand column, which also indicates the number of anagrams they are expected to find in each line.TheLongestTime

The Longest Time.pdf


SOLUTION:

1 said  2 me  3 tonight  4 still   5 left  6 write  7 what  8 could   9 time  10 once  11 was  12 now   13 goes  14 where  15 arms  16 there  17 miracle  18 how   19 need  20 how 21 me   22 maybe  23 last  24 feel   25 right  26 could   27 wrong  28 maybe  29 this  30 for   31 much  32 when   33 take   34 start  35 said   36 on   37 heart  38 now   39 are 40 wonderful   41 and   42 care  43 things  44 bad  45 intend


The students will be using their knowledge about grammar and vocabulary to rearrange the letters of the words whenever communication is interrupted as they read. Word categories and collocations will prove useful in some cases, spelling will be decisive in a few others, yet a good number of anagrams will be solved by focusing on meaning and thinking of words with similar letters (and which belong to the right category and with the right spelling) that might be the most appropriate for that context.

The activity is checked by having the students listen to the song at the end. Did they solve most of the anagrams? How did they solve them? Which anagram did they find the easiest? And the most difficult? Why? After checking the meaning of some of the anagrams in the song, can they now write a sentence using some of them?

 

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Online Generators to Practise Speaking and Writing

Randomness is an element that we’ve been using in learning tasks for a long time, especially those that involve productive skills. Rolling dice or shuffling cards are classic examples of activities in which students make choices based on unpredictable results. There is, of course, a sense of limit and control once the students know the goals and specific objectives of the task, but introducing surprise and letting fate decide for us often results in students trying their best at moving on with whatever they have at hand (which, incidentally, simulates real-life situations or even test-taking skills) and improves their motivation by making them get out of the comfort zone that teacher-led and teacher-controlled practice provides.

There’s a good number of online generators that offer interesting options for students to practise speaking and writing, and which revolve around the idea of randomness. They are web-based and very easy to set up to work with the whole group or in smaller teams. They are also flexible enough to be used together with specific strategies or a particular classroom structure — or better yet, to allow for student creativity.

 

Random Plot Generators

These two sites can help students get a random story line they can start working on, including the setting, the main characters, and a few details about the conflict. Other features such as “Random First Line”, “Random Dialogue”, “Story Title”, or “What if? Scenario” also provide intriguing starting points for writing or speaking tasks.

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plot-generator.org.uk goes one step further and allows you to discuss specific nouns, locations, adjectives related to feelings, or action verbs we want to see in our stories, poems, or even song lyrics. The generators take all these options into account to provide a final version or a first draft that the students need to work on.

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Conversation starters 

Both websites offer a wide variety of topics to start any discussion or debate:

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Discussion generator

 

The Story Shack and Writer Igniter

A suggested word count, the genre, the main character and a sentence uttered by him/her, or specific information to be included in the story, are some of the ideas provided by these generators every time to hit the “Generate” or “Shuffle” buttons!

TheStoryShack

 

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The Game Gal
This word generator gives you words to play games like pictionary, catchphrase, or charades. Just choose which game you’re playing and a category, and then tap for a new word.

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Writing Sparks

Click on “Create Spark” and then choose the age of your students, the type of writing and the amount of time. The site will provide a prompt for students and a planning stage, including timed whole-class discussion with key words, before the students start writing.

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Where I’m From

Based on “Where I’m From” (1993) by George Ella Lyon, this activity takes students through a journey of self-reflection by identifying memories and traditions that have marked their lives as they work on comprehension skills and vocabulary. The students first read the poem and match the underlined words with the pictures. Apart from clarifying or providing the meaning of new words, this first approach will allow them to get a general idea of what the poem is about. An mp3 audio file with the author reading the poem is available here.

Where I'm From 1WhereI’mFrom.pdf

The students then delve into the text by completing the table with one example from the poem for each of the categories: a family name, the place of birth, something learnt as a child, and so on. Under the second column, the students write examples about themselves for each category with a two-fold purpose: demonstrate comprehension of the text by making connections with their own world, and brainstorm ideas for the writing task to follow.

Where I'm From 2

Following the prompts provided, most of which they should be familiar with by now, the students fill in the blanks to write their own versions of the poem.

Where I'm From 3

WhereI’mFrom-Worksheet.pdf

This task can be a fantastic ice-breaker or team-building activity at the beginning of the year once the students edit their poems and are ready to share them. Creating short videos or recording the poems (and use them later for work on pronunciation) are two other ways in which students can share their poems:

14 Song-Based Lesson Plans and Activities

Although I know I like using music in my teaching, I never thought there would be so much of it on this blog when I started it over a year ago. Songs are fun, authentic sources with multiple possibilities in the classroom, but the main reason for having published 14 lesson plans and activities based on songs here is to a large extent due to copyright issues: while lyrics and songs are easily available for everyone online, access to other types of authentic texts is more limited because of copyright constraints. I also think the key to a successful song-based lesson is to deal with the text as you would with any other type of short text, whether written or oral, to practise a variety of comprehension skills, work on specific grammar and vocabulary, or introduce a topic for discussion.

Choosing a song that meets the students’ needs is not always easy, though. Apart from lyrics in standard English that are not too difficult to follow, the students shouldn’t be too familiar with them if you’re planning to do some language work with them. I think songs that focus on universal themes such as love, friendship or personal feelings, or songs that tell a story, are bound to work better no matter the music style. Most importantly, they are also more likely to adapt to our specific learning objectives.

The school year will be over for me in a few weeks, and I thought a post compiling these song-based lessons would be a good idea for future reference — but also to end the blogging season on a musical note!

Listening for specific information

1. The students listen for specific information by writing an explanation for each of the words, names or pictures in this timeline based on “Kilkelly, Ireland”, a song in which family news, including births and deaths, are shared for a period of thirty-two years.

Kilkelly

Listening for detail: “Kilkelly, Ireland”

2. “The Marvelous Toy” is used here to get the students to extract the main idea and listen for specific information and details that will be later used to write a paragraph.

Toy3

Writing a paragraph: “The Marvelous Toy”

Listening for the main idea

3.  Before working on an extract from Coleridge’s poem, the students become familiar with the plot of the story by listening to “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” as they put several pictures in the right order.

Mariners Ahoy! – “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”

Working on specific reading comprehension skills

4. In Parties, Story Maps and All That Jazz, the students work on comprehension skills, identifying and analysing story elements, making predictions and discussing the events in the story.

Story Line

Parties, Stories, and All That Jazz

5. By making predictions, reading between the lines or establishing connections both within the text and with the world outside, the students practise a wide variety of reading comprehension skills in this lesson based on “Tom’s Diner”.

Tom's Diner

Reconstructing a story from questions: “Tom’s Diner”

6. Students use context clues to fill in extracts from ten songs!

Using Context Clues: Ten Halloween Songs

Focusing on pronunciation

7. Using the theme song from “The Fresh Prince of Bel Air”, students recognise and practise the various features of connected speech which make the stress pattern and rhythm of English so distinctive.

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Working on Connected Speech: The Fresh Prince

Practising specific structures and vocabulary

8. Adding and deleting words from texts allow students to use their grammatical knowledge to manipulate sentences, play with the language, and analyse the impact each of these changes have on meaning. In this activity, students add and delete words from two songs following certain rules.

places

There Are Places I Remember

9. In “Big Yellow Taxi”, the students find two words in each sentence which should change places with each other in order to make sense.

big-yellow-taxi

Talking about the environment: “Big Yellow Taxi”

10. Paul Simon’s song is used here to provide practice on reported speech structures and reporting verbs.

Reported speech and creative writing: Fifty Ways

Revising language structures and vocabulary

Spelling, word order, context clues, inferences or sentence structure, including agreement, number or different tenses, are just some of the language skills the students will be practising in the last four lessons and activities:

11. “Your Song”

This Is Your Song: Fine-Tuning Comprehension And Language Skills

12. “Don’t Get Me Wrong”

Don'tGetMeWrong

Don’t Get Me Wrong!

13.“Lean On Me”

Making the right choices: “Lean On Me”

14.“Somewhere Only We Know”

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Pathways to Accuracy: “Somewhere Only We Know”

Thanks so much for reading!

Two-Sentence Stories

Ten popular two-sentence horror stories have been divided into three columns for students to match the beginning, middle and end. The goal here is for students to use contextual and cohesive clues that will allow them to rewrite these stories, starting with the beginning of each story under column A, then choosing the next part under column B, and finally thinking of a suitable ending under C. In addition, the students are asked to decide where the missing full stop between the first and the second sentence in each story should be.

Two-Sentence Stories

Two-Sentence Stories.pdf


ANSWERS:
1. I never go to sleep. I keep waking up.
2. The grinning face stared at me from the darkness beyond my bedroom window. I live on the 14th floor.
3. Lying in bed that night she asked why I was breathing so heavily. I wasn’t.
4. I woke up to hear knocking on glass. At first, I thought it was the window until I heard it come from the mirror again.
5. There was a picture in my phone of me sleeping. I live alone.
6. Working the night shift alone tonight. There is a face in the cellar staring at the security camera.
7. They delivered the mannequins in bubble wrap. From the main room I begin to hear popping.
8. You get home, tired after a long day’s work and ready for a relaxing night alone. You reach for the light switch, but another hand is already there.
9. A girl heard her mom yell her name from downstairs, and started to head down. As she got to the stairs, her mom pulled her into her room and said “I heard that too.”
10. I walked into the bathroom one night and looked at myself in the mirror. Only one of us walked out.


The students choose the three stories they find the creepiest, write a brief explanation for each of them, and share their thoughts with the rest of the class.

Now display the following:

FullSizeRender

FullSizeRender

What is scary about this? Why? Think about the tiny little things and everyday struggles of life in the 21st century. What “scares” you the most?

After brainstorming a few ideas as a whole group, ask the students to come up with a two-sentence story featuring one of those everyday life “struggles”, edit it, publish it, and then share it. My students are teenagers in Spain, so most stories were about technological issues, social media, school (especially exams and deadlines) or getting around the city.

Your alarm goes off and you hit the snooze button for 5 more minutes. When you wake up, you realise your final exam was an hour ago.

You have been stalking a friend on Instagram. Suddenly, you accidentally like an old picture.

That was a long queue to get on the bus. My travel card had expired and I had no money on me.

9:00 a.m.. 7% battery life and no charger.

The final discussion based on these stories allowed the students to share experiences and make personal connections with each other in an active, student-centred learning environment that also encouraged critical thinking as the students analysed and assessed these attitudes and behaviours.

Writing a paragraph: “The Marvelous Toy”

Here is a lesson I’ve been using to teach the younger learners how to write a simple paragraph. Extracting the main idea and relevant information from a text, making inferences, using basic connectors to link ideas, or creating a picture with information from the text and personal experience, are also some of the main skills that will have been worked on by the end of the lesson.

1. Have students listen to the song “The Marvelous Toy” by Tom Paxton. Elicit the main idea.

2. In groups, students read the lyrics of the song and underline the different characteristics of the toy. For example:

– many bright colours
– “zip” when it moves, “bop” when it stops, “whirr”when still
– two big green buttons on the bottom
– lid
– no name
– unique
– everyone loves it
– nobody knows what it is!

TheMarvelousToy-Lyrics.pdf

3. Teams report back to the rest of the class. Write a web with all the ideas and ask questions such as “Does it have wheels?”, “How do you start it?”, “Is it remote controlled?”, “What do you think the lid is for?”, etc. in order for students to infer other features not explicitly shown in the text.

Toy 1

4. Tell the students they are going to write a paragraph about the toy with the information they have. Explain what makes a good formal paragraph:

topic sentence 

supporting details (revise basic connectors used to link ideas, e.g. “first”, “then”, “next”, “in addition”, etc.)
conclusion

5. Write with the students the topic sentence and one or two more sentences, asking them for ideas and discussing them. Model through the process, reminding them of the different features.

Toy2

6. Have the students finish the paragraphs by themselves. Discuss the type of information the final sentence should include.

7. The students share their paragraphs with the rest of the class and discuss any differences.

8. Finally, the students draw a picture of the toy according to the song. You may want to discuss what other features are left open for them to be creative (shape, pattern, size, material). But remind them we can’t have a name for it in any of the languages we speak! (“I never knew just what it was, and I guess I never will”.) Students then write a second paragraph independently including some of the new features and their personal opinion about the toy.

9. Hold a gallery walk!

MT

A school community building project

The last few weeks have been busy at school. It’s the fourth year we organise a musical in which students across the years, from 12- to 18-year-olds, participate by acting, singing, holding a cardboard tree on stage or playing an instrument. Admittedly, this may not be directly linked to language learning as is usually the case here, but let me make an exception this time and share this school-wide project with immediate practical implications for our daily life at our state secondary school, but also for learning in general.

It was some sort of need to do some school community building that got us started, in an attempt to get the students involved in school affairs beyond the project itself with a non-academic activity that would focus more on social skills. My department is very much into music, and a musical seemed like the perfect format that the students across ages could find somewhat attractive, a musical about our school that would involve students, parents and teachers. Using the excuse of a ghost that was trapped in our school even before it was built, the first musical dealt with the history of the school itself, with references to subjects, teachers, caretakers, canteen and cleaning staff, headteachers, secretaries — you name it! Of course, there had to be a love conflict, which was solved in the second musical on the following year. The third one was a version of “Dracula”, and this year Alice travelled to a wonder school in which our current educational system was revisited in a critical yet constructive manner.

A project like this would find it difficult to succeed without the efforts of exceptional teachers like my colleague Eduardo, also a teacher of English, who has volunteered his time from the very start to write the scripts, hold rehearsals with the performers and the band twice a week, and coordinate with dancers, the school choir, or the staff at the local auditorium where the musical is performed first on a Wednesday night for the families and the general public, and then on a Thursday morning for the students. Even to get this teacher to sing in front of an audience! It’s easy to see how the over 100 people on stage each year have benefited from his leadership skills, enthusiasm and hard work, but no matter how simple or complex the project may seem, the impact on our school community has been far-reaching. I don’t even know how much we are aware of this.

Not only does school community building link students, parents and teachers and promote inclusiveness and responsibility, but it also has major implications for learning and development, ultimately affecting academic motivation. Indeed, in this project students from different age groups, backgrounds, and learning and social abilities get to gather and share experiences on a weekly basis from the beginning of the school year as they make meaning together and unleash their feelings. A collective drive that has proved to be highly infectious for the past four years and which has marked and influenced our school in many different ways; sometimes in ways that are difficult to measure — or even to write about.

Thank you, Eduardo.


After watching some of the characters interact with Alice, the Chesire Caretaker who works at the wonder school finally yells to the audience: “Lunatics! They are all lunatics!”