Don’t Get Me Wrong

Students use grammatical and lexical knowledge, context clues and comprehension skills to solve this puzzle and reconstruct the lyrics of “Don’t Get Me Wrong” (The Pretenders, 1986). The students first start in the centre of the circle at number 1, follow the arrows outwards and inwards, and move clockwise. The lines are numbered for easier reference. There are three rings:

  • The inner ring, in which the words cannot be changed or moved. These belong to the beginning of odd-numbered lines and the end of even-numbered lines.
  • The middle ring contains a series of words which must be put in the right order.
  • The outer ring, which the students use to end or start a line by looking for a suitable phrase somewhere in the ring. The students are also provided with a few prompts in the writing sheet to help them move on.

Finally, the students listen to the song, check their answers, and try to explain any mistakes or difficulties.

Don'tGetMeWrong

Don’tGetMeWrong.pdf

Don'tGetMeWrongWorksheet

Don’tGetMeWrong-WritingWorksheet.pdf

Lyrics.pdf

This positive, vibrant song about one’s feelings in somebody’s proximity can also be used as an introduction to this short film. After summarising what the song is about, have the students watch the short film and discuss whether the woman or the man in the film would be the singers of “Don’t Get me Wrong” and explain why. Perhaps both in different ways? The students can then watch it again and write a short review using these questions as a guide:

  • What is the title of the film?
  • What genre is it?
  • Where is it set?
  • What is the story about?
  • What is the main theme?
  • What do you think of the film?
  • Would you recommend it?

“If music be the food of love, play on”

William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night

 


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Film Dubbing: a Flexible Integrated Skills Task

A context or topic that is relevant and interesting for the students is one of the main factors that helps to make language learning tasks successful and memorable. Flexibility is another ingredient: if tasks are flexible, the students will be able to work at their own performance level while working on the same goal. This is especially important in mixed-ability groups or teams within a group, but it also holds true for other more homogeneous settings where each student may need more work on different areas and skills at a given time. Finally, flexible tasks carried out in engaging contexts result in student ownership. When students manage to create something that is unique by making the necessary connections, linguistic and non-linguistic alike, learning naturally results.

There are probably many other elements that help to make tasks and lessons successful and meaningful, but over the years I’ve found these three elements to be decisive. This doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t expose our students to topics they are not interested in or less flexible tasks such as having them practise a particular structure; however, trying to twist the dullest of content or routine practice (see also: “coursebook”) to include at least some of these characteristics often pays off.

A flexible task that I like doing with my teenage students is film dubbing. At its very simplest, the students are shown a clip from a film again and again with no sound until they can write a script and read it as they synchronise with the actors in the scene. Clips from classical or popular films work best as the motivation to deconstruct the whole thing will be higher (I’ve used clips from “Casablanca”, “Gone with the Wind”, “The Goonies”, “Braveheart” or even “Rambo”!) MovieClips.com and its YouTube channel has tons of clips to choose from. The students first identify the number of people participating in the dialogue and the length of each contribution, then they brainstorm ideas in their teams or in pairs, and finally write the script down. Apart from language accuracy, the students will be manipulating the language so that it fits each contribution, they will be making decisions regarding register, and they will be practising pronunciation skills such as intonation.

As the students make the scene their own, in a flexible setting and with a topic of their choice, the students analyse the language by comparing how they thought something should be said and how it is actually said, or simply by becoming aware of language gaps and making up for them. Again, this is a highly personal process but in this case within a context that is engaging enough for language needs to become personally salient and, therefore, more likely to be acquired. And once the clips are shared with the rest of the class, a good amount of language will come into play and a great opportunity to focus on specific language items through mini-lessons based on the students’ production.

I’ve always kept it low-tech, but this activity can get as simple or technologically complex as you want, and you may even want to consider recording the dialogues and adding them to each clip using software such as Movie Maker — even special effects! Would you give it a go? Have you tried anything similar?


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Critical thinking and language skills: “There Was Once”

In “There Was Once”, Margaret Atwood plays with Western culture stereotypes by questioning them to such extremes that the narrator is finally unable to tell her story. You may have worked with fractured tales before, but this ingenious exercise in deconstruction will get the students talking and analysing, revising — or perhaps confirming — their own viewpoints, and it will ultimately promote the development of critical thinking skills while working with the language.

1. In groups, students read the words in the box taken from the story they are about to read and make predictions by filling out a possible story map using those words. Groups share their story maps with the rest of the class. Discuss similarities and differences.captura-de-pantalla-2017-02-09-a-las-20-39-37

StoryMap.pdf

2. Although the text is a dialogue, it also works very well if either the teacher or one student reads one role and the rest of the students take turns reading the rest of the lines, resulting in a much more interactive reading experience. There are 24 lines for the second speaker in the text; assign each line to different students and allow them to practise reading their lines aloud for a few minutes. Read the dialogue as a whole class.

3. The students write down their personal reaction to the story independently for a few minutes. Their reactions should be just a few sentences long: “What do you think of the story?”, “How do you feel?”, “Do you like it?”, “Why?/Why not?” All the students in the class stand up and are asked to share their reactions randomly; if someone else has something similar, the student can sit down.

4. Once everyone is sitting down, the students discuss all the main ideas that have been shared as a whole group. Students often enjoy this clip from Monty Python on a rather different version of “Little Red Riding Hood”, which should help with the debate.

5. Refer students back to the story map they worked on at the beginning of the lesson and tell them that they will be writing a five-paragraph story using the same words in the box. In groups of four, students are numbered out for collaborative writing purposes:
– Students start writing their first paragraph introducing the setting and the characters. When the time is up, students hand out their papers to the person with the following number: number 1s to number 2s, 2s to 3s, 3s to 4s, and number 4s to number 1s.
– Students read the introduction and write a second paragraph with the first event in the story. Rotate papers again.
– Third paragraph: second event in the story. Rotate papers.
– Fourth paragraph: third event and rotate.
– The student that started writing the narrative reads the story and writes an ending.

Each of these stages should be timed, although the amount of time needed will depend on the level of the students and the type of support they need. This is also a great opportunity to have students proofread each other’s writings, have them edit their stories and hand in a final version to be shared with the rest of the class. How do their stories differ from the story maps at the beginning of the lesson?

Little Red Riding Hood illustration from by H is for Home, on Flickr

Little Red Riding Hood illustration from” (CC BY-NC 2.0) by H is for Home

Description, down to a fine art

Improving the students’ organisational skills and getting them ready to write a well-rounded description of a painting are the main goals of this activity which was originally part of a longer unit around the topics of reading and literature. I first chose six classical paintings in which someone is reading a book.

The paintings are hidden behind black squares (see PowerPoint file below) and are progressively displayed square by square to draw the students’ attention to each part of the painting. The idea here is to encourage active conversations in which the students make predictions about the books, the people and the places, and the relationship between the main elements in each painting, as they are gradually revealed. Descriptive vocabulary such as “at the top” or “in the bottom left-hand corner” can also be introduced or revised at this point.

Paintings.ppt

The students use the oral discussion and their own ideas and personal impressions to complete a graphic organiser for each painting, first writing down a few words that describe the book, the person or people reading and the place, and then thinking of how each of these are related.

go-2

This is a fairly flexible task which allows the students to use their own vocabulary based on their proficiency level, but it’s also a good time to introduce new words that the students may need that should not be missed. In addition, by having them make connections (book-person, person-place, place-book) and write down their ideas in the circles, the students are encouraged to think beyond the painting and use these critical thinking skills to enrich their descriptions:
– What type of book do you think it is?
– Are they reading for pleasure? To find information?
– Are they enjoying it? Why do you think so?
– Are they in a public or a private room? Do they look comfortable? What can the place tell us about the person?

Depending on the level of the students, you may need to model or go over the elements that make a descriptive text both coherent and cohesive, and which will help them to express all the ideas gathered to the best of their ability. The students can then be asked to write the description of the painting they like most or simply assign one to each student, and later hold an art exhibition in class where the students are given the opportunity to share and compare their own writings. Can the students now use these observational, organisational and critical thinking skills to choose a painting or photograph of their choice that can be added to the art exhibition and write a well-rounded description independently?


All images are Public Domain

I’m Going Back

I’m a big fan of All at C, probably the first blog with high quality teaching resources that I started following. Their superb lessons based on the John Lewis ad of the year are a classic in my classroom, so when I watched Heathrow’s Christmas advert a few days ago the first thing I did was to check their site. Call it premature seasonal impatience, but I also couldn’t help but start sketching my own activity as I look forward to further inspiration.

Heathrow’s ad is about an ageing teddy bear couple, Mr. and Mrs. Bair, who arrive at the airport and start their journey through it before reuniting with their family. The students work on the story line below in which the different situations they experience are explained with pictures. To guide them through the process, the students are also provided with a list of words that serves two purposes: to introduce difficult or unknown words (such as dangle, mistletoe or conveyor belt) and to help them to explain what is going on when using the picture prompts and establishing connections between them.

heathrow-ad-worksheet

I’m Going Back.pdf

Watch the beginning of the video first until 0:12 and do the first three scenes with the students in order to introduce the characters and the context, and for the students to get familiar with the procedure. The students then work together and write down what they think might be happening in each situation. When the students have finished, watch the video until 1:00 and have them check their answers, comment on any differences, and make any necessary changes.

Finally, the students make predictions about the end of the video orally and then watch it. In the large blank circle, they work independently and draw the picture or pictures that they think best depict that final scene. In addition, they may also add three words that can help to explain their personal reaction to it. Sharing and comparing their answers with the rest of the class at the end is bound to leave a memorable, lasting impression based on each student’s unique feelings and beliefs.

 

Images from openclipart.org, Public Domain.

6 simple web-based applications for short writing tasks

There are several free websites that allow you to write any type of text collaboratively, illustrate it, create a comic or a storyboard, or even to design other more sophisticated forms of writing such as interactive stories. Most of them, however, require student registration and therefore parental permission may be needed, and they tend to be time-consuming for short writing tasks. Even so, there are still a small number of web-based applications to publish different types of writing that are extremely easy to use, supported by all operating systems and web browsers, and which can be lots of fun! This last step in the writing process is often saved as a picture, which can be then shared on a flash drive or by email — and no registration is needed.

Star Wars Intro Creator

This application allows students to write their own opening crawl and play it later. Just enter your text in each of the spaces available, including the title and a sub-title, then copy the url at the end, and finally paste it for it to be shared.

star-wars-intro-creator

This crawl creator offers multiple publishing possibilities for creative writing. So far I have used it to have the students publish short writings based on their daily routines (waking up early in the morning can get the most epic and dramatic narrative effects from teenagers!) Introducing your lesson or project objectives, or even providing a summary of the work done at the end, are also attention-catching and memorable ways in which this tool can be used in the classroom.

Newspaper Clipping Generator and Newspaper Article Generator.

Both applications allow you to create newspaper-looking articles just by filling in the blank spaces with the newspaper name, the headline, the date, and the article itself. One of them even allows you to upload a picture to go with the article. Click on the “Generate” or “Make it” buttons and save as a picture.

newspaper-clipping-generator

These articles can be follow-up news to something the students have read, either fictional or factual, or perhaps a news item that they would like to see in the near future related to new discoveries and inventions — even some big change that will contribute to make our world a better place! The students could also use these newspaper generators to write and share what they did over their summer or spring holidays, or during a school trip, either on their own or after interviewing other classmates.

newspaper-generator

Mobile Phone Text Creator

Use ifaketext to have students write simple phone text conversations to exchange personal information or make arrangements with friends, introduce grammar or vocabulary in context (perhaps using some of your students’ names and the information you have about them to make it even more personal and meaningful), or to check comprehension of a story by having the students write a dialogue between two or three characters in it. Once again, all you need to do is enter the text, add as many lines as needed, and then save the conversation as a jpeg image.phone-text-creator

Speech Bubble Editor

Simply upload an image, add speech and thought bubbles to it, and save the whole thing as a picture. Create a story or a comic, show understanding of a text by writing key sentences on a picture that is relevant to the text, compare what the people in the pictures are saying and what they could be thinking — the sky’s the limit!speech-bubble-editor

Tweet Generator

We all know about the summarising power of tweets, limited to just 140 characters. Apart from summarising a text, this tweet generator could also be used to write your personal reaction to a text, your opinion about an issue that will be discussed in class, or to highlight what each student has learnt during the lesson and share their reflections with the rest of the class. I also use it as part of a interdisciplinary project after reading some extracts from Jules Verne’s “Around the World in Eighty Days”; the students then design their own trip around the world in 8 days using a variety of means of transport and writing one tweet a day in which the students provide clues about the place they are visiting that day but without mentioning the place name. At the end, the students work together to trace each others’ routes on world maps and even assess whether travel times and time zones are used correctly.tweet-creator

Building comprehension skills and summarising: “Annabel Lee”

In this illustrated version of Edgar Allan Poe’s narrative poem “Annabel Lee”, the students get engaged in three main tasks as they complete the poem:
– filling in the blank circles with a word from the word bank,
– using lexical and grammatical knowledge to find a suitable word for any rectangle, and
– matching a few verses from the poem with the pictures with no words.
By doing this, the students work at different linguistic levels simultaneously, with every decision taken affecting each other as the students construct meaning while demonstrating comprehension.

annabel-lee-1annabel-lee-2annabel-lee-3

Annabel Lee.pdf

But this activity can also be part of a larger lesson that focuses on comprehension and helps the students to identify key words in a text and use them to write a summary. Before reading the poem, the students are asked to focus on the beginning of the story: describing the picture with the setting first, then reading the first two lines and writing the following two verses using one of the rhyming words provided, and finally making predictions about what they think their story could be about based on a number of key words. Apart from setting the scene and getting the students ready for the reading comprehension activity, this lead-in also introduces the students to summarising skills that will be practised later in the lesson

annabel-lee-lead-in

Annabel Lee Lead-In.pdf

After working on the poem and checking understanding by having the students look for words with a similar meaning in the text and complete a story map, the students select five words from the poem that help to explain how they feel about it. This personal reaction to the text and the selection of words that determine the mood of the story will be the basis for the summary that the students will be writing at the end of this lesson.

annabel-lee-follow-up

Annabel Lee Follow-Up.pdf


Special thanks to Kena Piña for giving permission to use her brilliant illustrations in this activity and to publish it here. Please check her blog at https://jointherector.com